Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint


Reader Response to “Don’t Marry Career Women” – Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint

Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint
AaronM
Newbie
AaronM
I am surprised that considering the gravity of the article by Noer, Forbes would be relegated to having to post such a weak, conjecture riddled, emotionally charged rebuttle so that women would be satiated in remaning ignorant to such an alarming truth.

I belive that the article by Noer is extremely well written, highly accurate, and well fortified with good statistics and references. Despite the fact that the article is indeed the opinion of one writer, Noer is successful in remaining objective while providing his viewpoint.

In a 180° contrast, Corcoran simply responds directly to views expressed by Noer, and does little to counter any of the his views.

That is, unless you consider the following quotes by Corcoran “counterpoints”:

– “Studies aside..”

These words couln’t have been any more foreboding.

– “…guys…”

The use of this word, in this fashion, in this venue, illustrates that Corcoran is not attempting to come across as professional, but rather as personal.

– “..I..”, “..me..”

Not surprising, Corcoran consistently speaks from personal belief and opinion. Notice that other than quoting, Noer never regards himself directly; Corcoran has no other recourse than to use her personal experiences.

– “Take, for instance, the claim that professional women are more likely to get divorced…”

Notice that this paragraph is followed not by research or sources, but by personal opinion. The coincidence is less than surprising considering the source.

– “Michael is right…”

Though true with a period at the end, note how, again, Cocoran expresses no original thought, but instead simply says, “Oh yea? Well, this is what i have to say to THAT!”

– “So guys, if you’re game for an exciting life…”

I’m sorry, i thought the point of Noer’s article was that marrying a career women is grounds for a failed marriage, not “Why being married to a career woman is boring”. Apparently, Cocoran could not find a strong point to end on (hardly unexpected considering no well-founded points were given in the first place). Apparently she realized that she was going no where with her response, so instead she resorts to a “So there!” ending.

After watching “Good Morning”, it doesn’t surprise me that the women they interviewed would be so angered by such powerful, truthful accusations. However, it doesn’t surprise me that no female has yet to provide any type of educated responses, and that the given counterpoint was apparently the pinnacle of what they received in the time that it took to have this article re-posted. Coincidence? HARDLY.

I would love to get into my own personal beliefs on this subject, but they’re moot. I agree with Noer whole-heartedly, and that is enough. If this was so untrue, those professional women would have nothing to worry about – their “truth of the matter” would speak for itself, and the rest of us would “miss out”. There would be no need to get upset over something if it was completely fallible.

Sorry ladies, the truth hurts.

Message Edited by AaronM on 08-25-2006 09:03 AM

08-25-2006 08:56 AM

Re: Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint
zacharias
Regular Contributor
zacharias
“If this was so untrue, those professional women would have nothing to worry about – their “truth of the matter” would speak for itself, and the rest of us would “miss out”. There would be no need to get upset over something if it was completely fallible.”

Good analysis, and this last statement sums it all up in a nutshell.

“Methinks the ladies doth protest just a shade TOO much.”

08-25-2006 09:27 AM

Re: Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint
fellxtcat
Newbie
fellxtcat

Magazine articles are usually a combination of statistical evidence and personal beliefs. The topic of whether to marry a career “girl” is no different. Certainly this is a heated debate, with personal feelings intermixed with psychological and sociological findings. While some, like , may feel that women who have a college education and careers are more likely to be divorced, there are some studies who support just the opposite. In the Journal of Marriage and Family (2001), it was shown that women who have high incomes, both independently and in relative terms with their husbands, are more likely to be happy in their marriage. It was also found that these women were not at any higher risk to get divorced than women with lower relative incomes. In fact, these women may indirectly be happy in their marriages, and therefore less likely to get divorced. The journal states,

“Within marriage, wives’ income may lower the risk of divorce by increasing couples’ shared resources, which eases economic hardship and increases the perceived and real costs of divorce” (Rogers, 2001).

On a more personal level, which certainly applies here, there is no mistake that women have long been blamed for many problems for which we do not hold all the responsibility. That’s why there’s a word for it: misogyny. Perhaps once women have power, and are involved in a less than egalitarian relationship, they find that they need to be separated from their husbands. Those in happy marriages, may have husbands who support them, while those who want to get divorced are stuck with men who are intimidated. This is perfectly understandable as the traditional role of men was to have the power and dominance and once this is threatened, a reaction is inevitable.

Surely, the intention of the author was to be provocative, but on a more moderate level, perhaps two-career families just need to try and little bit harder. And possibly, when women have a little more power, then have more choices with enable them to leave abusive, or simply men displaced by a shared sense of power. If you want to marry someone with a career, you may need to step up your game, whether you are male of female. Or you can just marry someone who can’t compete with you, so you can be the high earning hero.

Rogers, Stacey & Danelle Doboer. Changes in Wives’ Income: Effects of Marital Happiness, Psychological Well-Being and the Risk of Divorce. Journal of Marriage and Family 63(2). May 2001.

08-25-2006 09:41 AM

Re: Corcoran – conjecture based counterpoint
zacharias
Regular Contributor
zacharias
“Or you can just marry someone who can’t compete with you, so you can be the high earning hero.”

I never realized that marriage was supposed to be a “competition”. Silly me, I always thought it was a cooperative partnership.

08-25-2006 10:03 AM

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