Wages Fall Against Productivity


Reader Response to “Don’t Marry Career Women” – Wages Fall Against Productivity

Wages Fall Against Productivity
radiator
Regular Contributor
radiator

The “blame the career woman” line is masking a deeper problem.  Stop blaming us for decisions made by conservative corporate leaders:

08-29-2006 05:33 AM

Re: Wages Fall Against Productivity
Doc_Savage
Regular Contributor
Doc_Savage

Sorry, I haven’t had time to read all thats been going on here but how does “Dont Marry A Career Woman” equal “blame the career woman” for the state of the economy?

08-29-2006 07:43 AM

Re: Wages Fall Against Productivity
radiator
Regular Contributor
radiator

If wages fall, more than one person needs to work to raise a family, unless you are in the top income bracket.  This means that “career women” are needed to help maintain the family as a whole, depending, of course, on what standard of living you are looking at–let’s say you want the American Dream, though, for the sake of argument–the simple one of owning your own home and a working vehicle and being able to afford a modest annual vacation (not Forbes’ “Living Well” standards in another of their lists).  This would not include sending your kids to private schools.

Second, falling wages puts pressure on families and married couples and individuals for the obvious reason that this increases stress.  So it very well could be that the unhappinesses described in Noer’s article are at least in some cases due to increased economic stresses.

08-29-2006 08:19 AM

Re: Wages Fall Against Productivity
Doc_Savage
Regular Contributor
Doc_Savage

Right, OK, I gotcha.

But that opens up the argument again that feminist policies during the 60’s pushed many women out of the home and into the workplace because being a housewife was deemed “oppressive and demeening” and women wanted to be in on the “fun” of having jobs like men too. That in turn nearly doubled the workforce and lowered overall wages as a result.

Or have I got that wrong?

08-29-2006 08:46 AM

Re: Wages Fall Against Productivity
radiator
Regular Contributor
radiator

But that opens up the argument again that feminist policies

I would not agree with the term “policies” as the feminist movement was not institutionalized as much as that implies.  Theories, activist positions, yes.

during the 60’s pushed many women out of the home and into the workplace because being a housewife was deemed “oppressive and demeening” and women wanted to be in on the “fun” of having jobs like men too.

It wasn’t just about “fun”.  It was about not being financially dependent so that you can actually have a choice as to whether or not to leave your abusive husband.  It was about feeling like you had done something interesting with your life other than sweep floors and make dinner (not that that is bad, of course).  But you don’t get a Nobel Prize for being the world’s greatest housewife.  No glory there.  Much of the problem with housewifes was that their work was totally unappreciated and unvalued–particularly by their husbands.  It’s actually a hidden economy.

That in turn nearly doubled the workforce and lowered overall wages as a result.

Or have I got that wrong?

Actually, I agree with that–and I have already posted that elsewhere.  Of course, I also added that the Civil Rights Movement and GI Bill brought poor, non-white men into the workforce.  So why blame the women.

Where we may disagree is that I think that the business/corporate/government policies should support families *and* women’s working outside the home–and they do not.  I think it’s a systemic problem and Noer and others are wrong to lay the blame on the career woman. Why should women sacrifice so that overall wages stay high?  They will still end up with deadbeat dads and cheating husbands quite often, and then no way to get out of the situation because they have no income.  Just read my other posts.  Then we can talk.

08-29-2006 10:06 AM

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